Increases in positive psychological characteristics with a new relaxation-response curriculum in high school students.

Authors
Herbert Benson, Arthur Kornhaber, Carol Kornhaber, Mila N. LeChanu
Publication
Journal of Research and Development in Education
27(4), 226-231
Abstract

Evaluated self-esteem and locus of control in a group of high school students prior to, during, and following a single academic year. Using a randomized, crossover experimental design, 26 Ss were exposed to either a health curriculum based on elicitation of the relaxation response (RLR) and then a follow-up period, while 24 were assigned to a control health curriculum and then the RLR. Psychological testing was conducted using the Piers-Harris Children’s Self Concept Scale and the Nowicki Locus of Control Scale for Children. Exposure to the RLR curriculum, but not the control curriculum, resulted in significant increases in self-esteem and a tendency toward greater internal locus of control scores. Teacher observations indicated a high degree of student acceptance of RLR training. Results suggest that incorporation of the RLR into school curricula may increase positive psychological attitudes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

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