The relaxation response and hypnosis

Authors
Herbert Benson, Patricia A. Arns, John W. Hoffman
Publication
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
Volume 29, Issue 3, pp259-270
Abstract

Procedures for self- and hetero-hypnotic induction and for the elicitation of the relaxation response appear to be similar. Further, before experiencing hypnotic phenomena, either during a traditional or an active induction, a physiological state exists which is comparable to the relaxation response. This state is characterized, in part, by decreased heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure. After the physiological changes of the relaxation response occur, the individual proceeds to experience other exclusively hypnotic phenomena, such as perceptual distortions, age regression, posthypnotic suggestion, and amnesia.

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