Relaxation response may reduce blood pressure by altering expression of a set of genes

Authors
Towia Liebermann, Manoj Bhasin, Herbert Benson
Publication
AAAS Eureka Alert
Abstract

Researchers identified genes and biological pathways linked to immune regulation, metabolism, and circadian rhythm in people who reduced their hypertension after eight-week relaxation response training

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